Business Academic Skills

Learning Outcomes: * Identify the referencing format for various genres of literature. * Compile a reference list for various genres of literature. * Summarise relevant data in a resource. * Identify and record the usefulness of resources for a given assessment task. Rationale: * Acknowledging sources is an important part of good written communication skills. At university, students who do not cite in-text or include the full bibliographical details will be investigated for academic misconduct.At work, employers are increasingly requiring staff to acknowledge resources so that they can refer to the original source and meet accreditation requirements for professional bodies. * Summarising data is another key element of good written communication skills. At university, students are required to summarise literature and case studies. At work, employers want employees to summarise documents and include executive summaries in reports. * Once students are able to identify what a resource is about they are then able to critically evaluate the more detailed information contained within.Required Reading: * Textbook, Chapter 6 Harvard documentation * Textbook, Chapter 7 Evaluating and paraphrasing resources ————————————————- 1. Workshop Discussion 1: Annotated Reference Lists2 a. Annotated reference lists b. Referencing c. Summaries d. Brief annotations 2. Workshop Activity 1: Annotated Reference List11 a. Create an annotated reference list b. Mark the annotated reference list Workshop Discussion 1: Annotated Reference Lists Annotated reference listsAs with a normal reference list or bibliography, an annotated reference list is usually arranged alphabetically according to the author’s last name, however, the reference list for the Researching assessment task is organised by genre and the annotation should be about 60 words per citation. Each entry begins with the bibliographic details of the resource (the citation), followed by a brief annotation summarising the appropriate content and identifying relevant information, data and arguments and stating how it will be used to address the assessment question.Referencing Referencing within the context of academic writing performs two distinct purposes. Firstly, it provides an acknowledgement (the combination of an in-text citation within the body of the essay or report and an entry in the ‘References’ section of the essay or report) that the information source or work was used by the writer in creating their own piece of academic writing or work. Secondly, it allows another person who is reading this writer’s work to easily find this particular information source.With regard to the second purpose, although the formats of references change for different information sources, there are usually common features as well, such as: Author(s) surname(s) and initials Year that the work was published The title of the work The publisher or title of the publication These common features can be identified in the book example shown below: Title of book in minimal capitalisation Title of book in minimal capitalisation Place (city) of publication Place (city) of publication Year of publication Year of publication Publisher PublisherAuthors’ surnames and initials Authors’ surnames and initials Shearman, D & Sauer-Thompson, G 1997, Green or gone, Wakefield Press, Kent Town. Full stop at the end Full stop at the end Ampersand Ampersand Italics for book title Italics for book title Comma between elements except author and date Comma between elements except author and date These common features can also be identified in the journal article example shown below: Article title in minimal capitalisation and in single quotation marks Article title in minimal capitalisation and in single quotation marksYear of publication Year of publication Journal title in maximal capitalisation and italics Journal title in maximal capitalisation and italics Author’s surname and initials Author’s surname and initials Karlsson, AM 2009, ‘Positioned by reading and writing: literacy practices, roles, and genres in common occupations’, Written Communication, vol. 26, no. 1, pp. 53-76, viewed 15 February 2011, SAGE Premier database, DOI 10. 1177/0741088308327445. Database OR database and DOI OR the url only Database OR database and DOI OR the url only Page numbers Page numbersVolume and issue number in lower case Volume and issue number in lower case Date you viewed the internet site Date you viewed the internet site Note: Comma between all the elements except the author and date and a full stop at the end. Note: Comma between all the elements except the author and date and a full stop at the end. Again, these common features can also be identified in the example of a chapter in an edited book shown below: Chapter title in minimal capitalisation and in single quotation marks Chapter title in minimal capitalisation and in single quotation marksYear of publication Year of publication Authors’ surname and initials Authors’ surname and initials Editor’s initial and surname followed by (ed. ) Editor’s initial and surname followed by (ed. ) Edition Edition Stanwick, P & Stanwick, S 2011, ‘The foundation of ethical thought’, in N Campbell (ed. ) Business academic skills, 4th edn, Pearson Australia, Sydney. Book title in minimal capitalisation and italics Book title in minimal capitalisation and italics Publisher Publisher Note: Comma between all the elements except the author and date and a full stop at the end.Note: Comma between all the elements except the author and date and a full stop at the end. Place (city) of publication Place (city) of publication References must be listed alphabetically by the first author’s surname under the Harvard UWS system of referencing. The reference list should not use numbers, letters or bullet points at the beginning of each entry. Summaries A summary is a short and concise representation of main points, ideas, concepts, facts or statements. When summarising you should not alter the author’s original idea(s) or the degree of certainty with which the ideas are expressed.To write a good summary, you should read the text a number of times to develop a clear understanding of the author’s ideas and intentions, the meaning and details and the force with which the ideas are expressed. To write a summary: 1. Write notes in point form using specialised words as this will make it easier to express the ideas in your own words. Specialised words is what the text is actually about and need to be included in your summary, as without these words, the meaning of the summary will change completely. 2.Write the summary directly from your notes without re-reading the passage. 3. Refer back to the original source to ensure that your summary is a true reflection of the writer’s ideas. When summarising a chapter or article, the introduction and conclusion should provide a good overview of the content as well as the topic sentences which provide a quick outline of the main idea(s) presented in each paragraph. Brief annotations When writing a brief summary for an annotation, only the information relevant to the topic or assessment task should be included.That is, if the assessment task limits your investigation to the past ten years but your article covers a 50 year span, then your summary should focus on the past ten years. Identifying specific information relevant to the assessment task is also important. Therefore, refer back to your question analysis and mind map to create links between the summary information and how the data will be used to address the assessment. Note:Do not forget to record the bibliographical details (reference) and page number(s) so that you can refer back to the information at a later date. Example Annotated Reference ListJustify the importance of written communication skills in academia and employment in the twenty-first century. Genre – Wiki entry: never use in academia. Not assessed. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, no. 69 for correct Wiki reference and nos. 61-80 for correct internet references. Genre – Wiki entry: never use in academia. Not assessed. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, no. 69 for correct Wiki reference and nos. 61-80 for correct internet references. POOR EXAMPLE: This response has a plagiarised statement and would go through the academic misconduct process.If it had not been plagiarised it would have received a total mark of 12. 5/40 or 31%. Reference 1: Internet (Non-scholarly)| 1. Wikipedia 2011, ‘Literacy’, viewed 16 February 2011, ;lt;http://en. wikipedia. org/wiki/Literacy;gt;. | Not assessed Not assessed Annotation 1: Summary| Gives a definition of literary. | Not assessed Not assessed Annotation 1: Use| | Genre – newspaper article Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6 nos. 46-51 for correct newspaper references. Genre – newspaper article Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6 nos. 46-51 for correct newspaper references. Reference 2: Newspaper Article (Non-scholarly)| . M Davis 1993, ‘Literacy survey links reading, employment’, Dayton Daily News, Factiva database, viewed 15 February 2011. | Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant Annotation 2: Summary| It talks about how much money you will get paid if you have good literacy skills. | Blank Blank Annotation 2: Use| | Genre – industry magazine Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, nos. 32-39 for correct magazine references. Genre – industry magazine Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, nos. 32-39 for correct magazine references. Reference 3: Trade / Industry Magazine (Non-scholarly)| 3.Klie, S (2006) Canadian HR Reporter, 6 November, pp. 1 ;amp; 5, viewed 14 February 2011, ABI/Inform database. | Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant Annotation 3: Summary| This non-scholarly trade journal article talks about a survey done with 431 HR people. | Does not demonstrate how it will be used Does not demonstrate how it will be used Annotation 3: Use| Grammar and spelling is important for written communication skills. | Genre – book? Not enough info to determine if it is an industry website. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. no. 23 for correct book reference and no. 0 for correct edited book reference. Genre – book? Not enough info to determine if it is an industry website. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. no. 23 for correct book reference and no. 30 for correct edited book reference. Reference 4: Industry / Government Website (Scholarly)| 4. Browne, Ann. 2007 Teaching and learning communication, language and literacy| Not assessed Not assessed Annotation 4: Summary| Talks about how to develop literacy skills. | Not assessed Not assessed Annotation 4: Use| | Genre – journal article not a university or research centre. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, nos. 1, 62 ;amp; 67 for correct online document entry and nos. 32-39 for correct journal entries. Genre – journal article not a university or research centre. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, nos. 61, 62 ;amp; 67 for correct online document entry and nos. 32-39 for correct journal entries. Reference 5: University / Research Centre (Scholarly)| 5. Karlsson, AM 2009, ‘Positioned by reading and writing: literacy practices, roles, and genres in common occupations’, Written Communication, (26)1, 53-76,| Annotation 5: Summary| Plagiarised from abstract (academic misconduct) Plagiarised from abstract (academic misconduct)This scholarly site examines the role played by reading and writing in common non-academic occupations in Sweden and shows how written communication is important in any job not just hose that require a uni degree| Not assessed Not assessed Annotation 5: Use| The sales assesitant needs good written comuunication skills to do her job. | Genre – journal article not a scholarly magazine Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, no. 65 for correct magazine entry and nos. 32-39 for correct journal references. Genre – journal article not a scholarly magazine Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, no. 5 for correct magazine entry and nos. 32-39 for correct journal references. Reference 6: Scholarly Magazine (Quasi-scholarly)| 6. Wardrope WJ 2002, Business Communications Quarterly, volume. 65, number. 4, pp. 60-72, viewed 15 February 2011, Academic OneFile database. | Annotation 6: Summary| Not assessed Not assessed This article investigated the importance of business communication skills in the academic setting. | Not assessed Not assessed Annotation 6: Use| The assessment task examples will be used. | Genre – book? Not enough info to determine if it’s an edited book or not. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. , no. 23 for correct book reference and no. 30 for correct edited book reference. Genre – book? Not enough info to determine if it’s an edited book or not. Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap. 6, no. 23 for correct book reference and no. 30 for correct edited book reference. Reference 7: Chapter in an Edited Book (Scholarly)| 7. KJ HARTY 2008, Strategies for business and technical writing, 6th ed. | Annotation 7: Summary| Blank Blank | Blank Blank Annotation 7: Use| | Genre – journal article Poor Harvard UWS style – see Chap 6, nos. 32-39 for correct journal article entries. Genre – journal articlePoor Harvard UWS style – see Chap 6, nos. 32-39 for correct journal article entries. Reference 8: Journal Article (Scholarly)| 8. Ugbah, Steve D. Evuleocha, Stevina U. 1992. Journal of Employment Counseling, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 128-37,| Poor summary and not relevant Poor summary and not relevant Annotation 8: Summary| Interviewers want applicants to be resourceful and have written credentials. | Not specific enough and does not demonstrate how it will be used. Not specific enough and does not demonstrate how it will be used. Annotation 8: Use| The example of the hiring process willbe used. The reference list is not in a single format, most are in an unknown referencing style with the required bibliographic details missing. The list is also numbered. The reference list is not in a single format, most are in an unknown referencing style with the required bibliographic details missing. The list is also numbered. GOOD EXAMPLE: This reference list would obtain a total mark of 24/40 or 60% Reference 1: Internet (Non-scholarly)| Genre – online video Harvard UWS style – missing title and viewed date. Genre – online video Harvard UWS style – missing title and viewed date.Wagner, T 2009, ‘m 7 Skills students need for their future’, video, 10 October, ;lt;http://www. youtube. com/watch? v=NS2PqTTxFFc;amp;feature=related;gt;. | Annotation 1: Summary| Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant This video looked at oral and written communication as vital for a student’s to get a good job. | Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use Annotation 1: Use| The information on why good written communication skills leading to better jobs and higher wages will be used to support my argument. | Genre – newspaper articleHarvard UWS style – missing day and month of publication; database and viewed date in the wrong order. Genre – newspaper article Harvard UWS style – missing day and month of publication; database and viewed date in the wrong order. Reference 2: Newspaper Article (Non-scholarly)| Davis, M 1993, ‘Literacy survey links reading, employment’, Dayton Daily News, Factiva database, viewed 15 February 2011. | Annotation 2: Summary| Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant The information on getting money and better jobs, if you have really good literacy skills will be used. Annotation 2: Use| Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use The information on getting money and better jobs, if you have really good literacy skills will be used to support my argument. | Reference 3: Trade Journal / Industry Magazine (Non-scholarly)| Genre – industry journal Harvard UWS style – article title missing Genre – industry journal Harvard UWS style – article title missing Klie, S 2006, Canadian HR Reporter, 6 November, pp. 1 ;amp; 5, viewed 14 February 2011, ABI/Inform database. | Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant Annotation 3: Summary|This non-scholarly trade journal article talks about a survey done with 431 HR people. | Poor use – put in summary Poor use – put in summary Annotation 3: Use| The HR managers think that grammar and spelling should be emphasised in schools. | Reference 4: Industry / Government Website (Scholarly)| Genre – database not government website. Adequate Harvard UWS style Genre – database not government website. Adequate Harvard UWS style Carnevale, AP, Gainer, LJ ;amp; Meltzer, AS 1988, ‘Workplace Basics: The Skills Employers Want’, American Society for Training ;amp; Development and U. S.Department of Labor Employment ;amp; Training Administration, viewed 15 February 2011, ;lt;http://www. eric. ed. gov/PDFS/ED299462. pdf;gt;. | Annotation 4: Summary| Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant This scholarly government report examined from the employer’s perspective the necessary workplace skills that employees needed to succeed. | Annotation 4: Use| Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use The data on written communication leading to job placement and individual progression/advancement in employment will be used to support the question. |Reference 5: University / Research Centre (Scholarly)| Genre – university or research centre Poor Harvard UWS style Genre – university or research centre Poor Harvard UWS style Vic Careers 2006, Employment Skills Survey December 2006, Career Development and Employment Student Services Group, Victoria University of Wellington, viewed 15 February 2011, ;lt;http://www. victoria. ac. nz/st_services/careers/resources/employment_skills_2006. pdf| Annotation 5: Summary| Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant This scholarly report published the result of a survey done on 346 employers who recruit university graduates. Annotation 5: Use| Identifies specific data but not use Identifies specific data but not use The survey revealed that communication skills occupied the 2nd and 3rd most important skills required for employment. | Genre – scholarly magazine Harvard UWS style – magazine title not italicised Genre – scholarly magazine Harvard UWS style – magazine title not italicised Reference 6: Scholarly Magazine (Quasi-scholarly)| Shulman, J 2005 ‘Revaluing Writing’, Harvard Business Review, ;lt;http://hbr. org/2005/12/revaluing-writing/ar/1;gt;. | Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevantAnnotation 6: Summary| This article talks about how important writers are in product development. | Blank Blank Annotation 6: Use| | Genre – book? Not enough info to determine if it’s an edited book or not. Poor Harvard UWS style. Genre – book? Not enough info to determine if it’s an edited book or not. Poor Harvard UWS style. Reference 7: Chapter in an Edited Book (Scholarly)| Harty, KJ 2008, Strategies for business and technical writing, 6th ed. | Annotation 7: Summary| This book teaches you how to write resumes, letters, memos, e-mail, reports, and proposals. Not assessed Not assessed |Annotation 7: Use| Not assessed Not assessed These skills are important because you need to write a resume to get a job and then whne you are working you need to write reports and proposals| Reference 8: Journal Article (Scholarly)| Genre – journal article Harvard UWS style – missing viewed date. Genre – journal article Harvard UWS style – missing viewed date. Ugbah, Steve D. Evuleocha, Stevina U. 1992, ‘The importance of written, verbal, and nonverbal communication factors in employment interview decisions’, Journal of Employment Counseling, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 128-37, ;lt;http://eric. ed. ov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini. jsp? _nfpb=true;amp;_;amp;ERICExtSearchSearchValue_0=EJ451145;amp;ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no;amp;accno=EJ451145;gt;. | Annotation 8: Summary| Adequate summary Adequate summary This article talks about what factors influence interviewers. | Annotation 8: Use| Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use The information on resourcefulness, written credentials, support for arguments, social attributes, comportment, and style will be used to support the question. | EXCELLENT EXAMPLE: This reference list would obtain a total mark of 34. /40 or 86% Reference 1: Internet (Non-scholarly)| Genre – online video Excellent Harvard UWS style Genre – online video Excellent Harvard UWS style Wagner, T 2009, ‘7 Skills students need for their future’, video, YouTube, 10 October, viewed 16 February 2011, ;lt;http://www. youtube. com/watch? v=NS2PqTTxFFc;amp;feature=related;gt;. | Annotation 1: Summary| Good summary and relevant Good summary and relevant This online lecture from the co-director of Harvard’s Change Leadership Group identifies effective oral and written communication as vital for a student’s future in employment. Annotation 1: Use| Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use Statistics on employment levels could be used as supporting data to show that higher written communication skills equate to higher levels of employment and higher wages. | Reference 2: Newspaper Article (Non-scholarly)| Genre – newspaper article Excellent Harvard UWS style Genre – newspaper article Excellent Harvard UWS style Davis, M 1993, ‘Literacy survey links reading, employment’, Dayton Daily News, 11 September, viewed 15 February 2011, Factiva database. | Annotation 2: Summary| Good summary and relevantGood summary and relevant This non-scholarly newspaper article discusses the results of the National Adult Literacy Survey done in the United States. | Annotation 2: Use| Identifies specific data and use; statement is awkward. Identifies specific data and use; statement is awkward. The correlation data regarding higher writing skills and higher levels of employment, more weeks worked and higher wages highlights the significance of written communication in employment. | Genre – industry journal Very good Harvard UWS style – only the database OR the url is need NOT both Genre – industry journalVery good Harvard UWS style – only the database OR the url is need NOT both Reference 3: Trade Journal / Industry Magazine (Non-scholarly)| Klie, S 2006, ‘Good tech skills, poor talk skills’, Canadian HR Reporter, 6 November, pp. 1 & 5, viewed 14 February 2011, ABI/Inform database, <http://search. proquest. com/docview/220770420? accountid=36155>. | Annotation 3: Summary| Adequate summary and relevant; awkward statement. Adequate summary and relevant; awkward statement. This non-scholarly trade journal article highlights the findings of a survey of 431 HR practitioners with regard to skills that applicants need to be hired. Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use Annotation 3: Use| The data on English writing skills including grammar and spelling highlights the need for more literacy programs in academia. | Reference 4: Industry / Government Website (Scholarly)| Genre – government website Excellent Harvard UWS style Genre – government website Excellent Harvard UWS style Amodea, A, Jin, Y, & Kling, J 2009, Gaining the skills of employment literacy of female public assistance recipients, viewed 15 February 2011, <http://wdr. doleta. ov/research/FullText_Documents/Gaining_the_Skills_for_Employment_The_Literacy_of_Female_Public_Assistance_Recipients. pdf. >| Annotation 4: Summary| Adequate summary Adequate summary This government report looked at literacy skills and job opportunities in women getting government assistance to improve their literacy. | Adequate data and use Poor explanation of gov’t literacy programs used to increase employment opportunities. Adequate data and use Poor explanation of gov’t literacy programs used to increase employment opportunities. Annotation 4: Use|The information on poor literacy skills leading to getting government assistance show how important written communication is for getting a job. | Reference 5: University / Research Centre (Scholarly)| Genre – university Excellent Harvard UWS style Genre – university Excellent Harvard UWS style Vic Careers 2006, Employment Skills Survey December 2006, Career Development and Employment Student Services Group, Victoria University of Wellington, viewed 15 February 2011, <http://www. victoria. ac. nz/st_services/careers/resources/employment_skills_2006. pdf| Annotation 5: Summary| Good summary and relevant Good summary and relevantThis report surveyed 346 employers who recruit university graduates and showed that communication skills are the 2nd and 3rd most important skills needed to get a job. | Annotation 5: Use| Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use The findings regarding analytical skill needed in written communication supports the argument for theses skills in academia and employment. | Genre – scholarly magazine Excellent Harvard UWS style Genre – scholarly magazine Excellent Harvard UWS style Reference 6: Scholarly Magazine (Quasi-scholarly)| Shulman, J 2005 ‘Revaluing writing’, Harvard Business Review, vol. 83, no. 2, viewed 15 February 2011, <http://hbr. org/2005/12/revaluing-writing/ar/1>. | Annotation 6: Summary| Good summary and relevant Good summary and relevant This article highlight the need to utilise ‘writers’ in product development as these individuals use their written communication skill to analyse and clarify product design and use. | Annotation 6: Use| Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use The example of writers in the production process will be used to demonstrate how important written communications skills are in every aspect of the busniess precess including product development. Genre – edited book Excellent Harvard UWS style Genre – edited book Excellent Harvard UWS style Reference 7: Chapter in an Edited Book (Scholarly)| Forey, G & Lockwood-Lee, J (eds) 2010, Globalization, communication and the workplace: talking across the world, Continuum Logo, London; New York. | Annotation 7: Summary| Adequate summary and relevant Adequate summary and relevant This scholarly edited book explores the need for good English language communication skills in the services sectors of the healthcare, insurance, banking and media industries. | Poor – more specific data neededPoor – more specific data needed Annotation 7: Use| The fourth chapter on communication skills will be useful to highlight the problems employers are facing and the need for better written communication skills. | Reference 8: Journal Article (Scholarly)| Genre – journal article Very good Harvard UWS style – only the database OR the url is need NOT both Genre – journal article Very good Harvard UWS style – only the database OR the url is need NOT both Wardrope WJ 2002, ‘Department Chairs’ perceptions of the importance of business communications skills’, Business Communications Quarterly, vol. 65, no. , pp. 60-72, viewed 15 February 2011, Academic OneFile database, <http://find. galegroup. com/gtx/retrieve. do? resultListType=RESULT_LIST&contentSet=IAC-Documents&qrySerId=Locale%28en%2C%2C%29%3AFQE%3D%28JN%2CNone%2C34%29%22Business+Communication+Quarterly%22%3AAnd%3ALQE%3D%28D A%2CNone%2C8%2920021201%24&inPS=true&sort=DateDescend&tabID=T002&prodId=AONE&searchId=R1&retrieveFormat=PDF&currentPosition=5&userGroupName=uwsydney&docLevel=&docId=A96134828&noOfPages=13>. | Annotation 8: Summary| Good summary and relevant Good summary and relevantThis scholarly journal article investigated the importance of business communication skills in the academic setting and found that writing skills were more valued than generic business communication skills. | Annotation 8: Use| Identifies specific data and use Identifies specific data and use The discussion on relative importance of interpersonal communication, verbal communication, and cultural literacy will be used for my counter argument and the information on written communication will be used for my supporting argument. | Workshop Activity 1: Annotated Reference List Compile an annotated reference list (45 minutes)Working in groups, use the workshop readings to create an annotated reference list. Each reference should include the bibliographic details (the citation) and a brief two-part annotation summarising the relevant content and identifying specific information within the text and highlighting how it would be used to address the assessment question. Each annotation should be no more than 60 words for both parts. Workshop question:Evaluate the need for business ethics in a global economy. ————————————————- The workshop question shown above is NOT the actual assessment question.Please see the ‘Assessments’ link for further details. Annotated Reference List Insert YOUR response in the boxes below: Reference 1: Internet (Non-scholarly)| ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 1: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 1: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- |Reference 2: Newspaper Article (Non-scholarly)| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 2: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 2: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- | Reference 3: Trade Journal / Industry Magazine (Non-scholarly)| ————————————————- ———————————————— ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 3: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 3: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ———————————————— ————————————————- | Reference 4: Industry / Government Website (scholarly)| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 4: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ———————————————— | Annotation 4: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Reference 5: University / Research Centre (Scholarly)| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- |Annotation 5: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 5: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Reference 6: Scholarly Magazine (Quasi-scholarly)| ———————————————— ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 6: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 6: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- ———————————————— ————————————————- ————————————————- | Reference 7: Chapter in an Edited Book (Scholarly)| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 7: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ———————————————— ————————————————- | Annotation 7: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Reference 8: Journal Article (Scholarly)| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- Annotation 8: Summary| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Annotation 8: Use| ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- ————————————————- | Mark the annotated reference list (15 mins)Swap your answers with another group so that you mark each other’s work. Marking Matrix – Office use only| | Source 1| Source 2| Source 3| Source 4| Source 5| Source 6| Source 7| Source 8| Total | Reference| | | | | | | | | | Genre | | | | | | | | | | Summary | | | | | | | | | | Use| | | | | | | | | | Expression, SP&G| | | | | | | | | | RESEARCHING SECTION 2: ANNOTATED REFERENCE LIST/40%| | Clear Fail| Needs Work| Pass| Credit| Distinction| High Distinction| Harvard UWSreference| Not in any known referencing format * Missing required bibliographic details OR * No references included. |All or most references are not in Harvard UWS style but: * All required bibliographic details are present. * May or may not include view date and url/data base/DOI. | All references are in Harvard UWS style but: * Some required bibliographic details are not present and/or * They are poorly formatted. | The Harvard UWS style is acceptable: * Most of the required bibliographic details are present and/or * Not correctly formatted. | The Harvard UWS style is very good: * All required bibliographic details are present; but * It is not properly punctuated and/or * May or may not include view date and url/data base/DOI. Correctly formatted. | The Harvard UWS style is excellent: * Authors’ names are presented correctly * Date presented correctly * Titles are italicised * All required bibliographic details are present * May or may not include view date and url/data base/DOI. * Properly punctuated and * Correctly formatted. | /10| | | | | | | | 0-2. 5| 3. 0-4. 5| 5. 0-6. 0| 6. 5-7. 0| 7. 5-8. 0| 8. 5-10. 0|Genre | Less than 3 genres are included. | All or most genres are included but are not correctly identified. | 3 genres are included and correctly identified. | 4-5 genres are included and correctly identified. 6-7 genres are included and correctly identified. | All 8 required genres are included and correctly identified. | /7| * | * | * | * | * | * | | 0-1. 5| 2. 0-3. 0| 3. 5-4. 0| 4. 5| 5. 0-5. 5| 6. 0-7. 0| Summary | Less than 3 annotations clearly summarise the appropriate information. | 3-4 annotations clearly summarise the appropriate information. | 5 annotations clearly summarise the appropriate information. | 6 annotations clearly summarise the appropriate information. | 7 annotations clearly summarise the appropriate information. | All 8 annotations clearly summarise the appropriate information. /8| * | * | * | * | * | * | | 0-2. 0| 2. 5-3. 5| 4. 0-4. 5| 5. 0-5. 5| 6. 0-6. 5| 7. 0-8. 0| Use| Less than 3 annotations identify specific information and highlight how it could be used to address the assessment task. | 3-4 annotations identify specific information and highlight how it could be used to address the assessment task. | 5 annotations identify specific information and highlight how it could be used to address the assessment task. | 6 annotations identify specific information and highlight how it could be used to address the assessment task. 7 annotations identify specific information and highlight how it could be used to address the assessment task. |All 8 annotations identify specific information and highlight how it could be used to address the assessment task. | /10| * | * | * | * | * | * | | 0-2. 5| 3. 0-4. 5| 5. 0-6. 0| 6. 5-7. 0| 7. 5-8. 0| 8. 5-10. 0| Expression, spelling, grammar & punctuation| There are major grammatical errors which make the essay difficult to comprehend. | * Does not use formal, objective and concise language and/or * There are many spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. * Sometimes uses formal, objective and concise language and/or * There are some spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. | * Mostly uses formal, objective and concise language and/or * There are a few spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. | * Always uses formal, objective and concise language or * There are minor spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. | * Always uses formal, objective and concise language and * There are no spelling, grammatical and punctuation errors. | /5| * | * | * | * | * | * | | 0-1. 0| 1. 5-2. 0| 2. 5-3. 0| 3. | 4. 0| 4. 5-5. 0| Insert the MODEL response in the boxes below:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

x

Hi!
I'm Heidi!

Would you like to get a custom essay? How about receiving a customized one?

Check it out